iesorno

zegas:

All-New Ultimates #7 comes out today! I wrote it, Giannis Milonogiannis drew it, Jordie Bellaire colored it and David Nakayama did the cover. It’s a thing of beauty.

Villains: Vermin (created by J.M. DeMatteis & Mike Zeck) and Agent Crock (created by Ann Nocenti & Keith Giffen). Research was a blast.

Agent Croc? Is he from Ann Nocenti’s run on Daredevil?

God I love that run of comics. Some of the best superhero weirdness there is.

There’s one with a kid making a decision to not tell some horrible adult that they’re about to drink poisoned water. I think that’s amazing.

That series is only equalled by her run on Kid Eternity.

darkslover:

barnabasdeimos:

muchymozzarella:

twostriptechnicolor:

kane52630:

Baby-Doll
Batman: The Animated Series

This is one criminally underrated Batman villain.

SERIOUSLY THOUGH SHE WAS MY FAVORITE BATMAN VILLAIN

Her physical condition didn’t allow her to age

No one took her seriously as an actress

And even when she was trying to get into a happy romantic relationship (albeit with another villain) he still couldn’t take her seriously as a consenting, sexually active and romantically interested adult

That’s a lot of blows to someone’s psyche 

and Babydoll is both a sympathetic villain and a formidable one

I remember this episode fucked me up a a kid. 

And man, do I wish we could see this Batman again: the Batman that consoles his villains, because the majority (if not all) of them are mentally ill people. And Batman knows this and wants them healthy again, not punished and GOD definitely not dead.

I agree wholeheartedly. The animated Batman has taken its place in my head as the only worthwhile version of Batman.

He’s not a thug doing down everyone and as messed up as they are, he tries to actually help people and make the world better. He recognises their worth as humans even as he tries to stop the damage they create.

(via wellnotwisely)

erhardtdomonkos:

nyár

That’s a great sketch erhardtdomonkos

Really love the loose lines and the way they capture the shapes.

erhardtdomonkos:

nyár

That’s a great sketch erhardtdomonkos Really love the loose lines and the way they capture the shapes.

I Go Through Sketchbooks Pretty Quickly — The Nib — Medium

Joseph Remnant!

What an amazing artist, those sketches are so beautifully formed.

micdotcom:

Most people give the homeless change or leftovers, Mark Bustos is cutting their hair

For the past few months, New York City hairstylist Mark Bustos — who normally spends his days working at an upscale salon — has been volunteering on his days off to offer haircuts to homeless people he sees on the street. With a simple phrase, “I want to do something nice for you today,” he has been helping people get a fresh, uplifting makeover.

For people who have been trapped in a cycle of poverty, unemployment and homelessness, the makeover can also serve a useful function: looking presentable for a job.

Inspiring thanks he received from one man | Follow micdotcom

That’s cool

(via cerulean-warbler)

therevd76:

iesorno:

My most favourite moment.

This really shone in the magazine sized deadline. Not so hot in a comic sized comic.

Don’t listen to that guy.  :)  All three parts of ‘The Ragged Mile’, (the 2nd half of Exit) utilize this form / format, and it’s glorious no matter the scale of reproduction.

It really is tragic that this book’s been out of print since Caliber did their deeply shoddy, quickly-disintegrated collection.  The glue literally fell off every copy.  I hand-stitched mine together.

Have to agree about the Caliber collection, it fell to pieces in minutes.

Really would love to see the series collected again.

olivereast:

More monk’s washing

Beautiful composition of colour and shape.

olivereast:

More monk’s washing

Beautiful composition of colour and shape.

kierongillen:

This could only be any better if she went around beating up anyone in Superhero cosplay.

Made my day. Anyone for a Rubber Johnny or some Gang Green?

kierongillen:

This could only be any better if she went around beating up anyone in Superhero cosplay.

Made my day.

Anyone for a Rubber Johnny or some Gang Green?

Advice to the mid-career cartoonist who has failed to build an audience

twiststreet:

mikedawwwson:

Advice to the mid-career cartoonist who has failed to build an audience

I’ve been publishing comics for coming on twenty years now. It’s hard to pinpoint a start-date, as like many cartoonists I’ve just been drawing my whole life, but sometime around ‘95 would be when I began putting out ‘zines…

Uh, if I can add insult to injury: who did you even think your audience was?

Your graphic novels had a $20 list price, and you hadn’t really made a name for yourself before trying to charge people $20 to find out if you were any good at making comics.  

Did you think there were a lot of people who take that kind of risk with their money, and if so, why?  Is that how you buy comics— you just see books and then spend $20 on them, regardless of if you’ve never heard of who made them, week after week?  What kind of comic-buying budget are you dealing with that allows you to do that?  

If not, why are you selling comics differently from how you’re buying them?   Or did you believe that the comic audience pays a significant attention to good reviews or awards?  If so:  why???  I seriously don’t know what data could have lead you to believe any of that.  The Ignatz awards and NPR??

Plus:  your second comic seriously looks like a children’s comic but its description is “a story as much about adults as it is adolescents, the blurred line between childhood and manhood, and the consequences of authoritative posturing.  Dispensing with idyllic notions, Dawson describes the hilarious and brutal truths about boys and men, the hypocrisy of institutional morality and the resilience of Spam and the human spirit."  First of all, that is basically gibberish.  Secondly:  not kids…?  "All ages"-?  I can’t even tell from all that— all I know is that it’s not going to have "idyllic notions" (which is such a relief).  Your Booklist review for Troop 142 begins with "Be warned: this is not a book to give to prospective Boy Scouts”.  Even good reviews are starting with warnings to prospective audience members to not accidentally buy your comic!?  Booklist suggests it for a young adult audience (Grade 10-12?)— is that indicated anywhere else?  Not on the front cover and not on your publisher page for the book, but maybe on the back…?

Which may not matter because your third book?  Sure doesn’t sound like a young adult book— “In Angie Bongiolatti we get to follow a group of young New Yorkers as they navigate the slippery slopes between work, play, friendship, sex and politics in a post 9/11 world.”  Are you trying to sell “New Yorkers navigating sex” to extremely mature Boy Scouts?  Why did you think the young adult book about camp would build an audience for … whatever (?) this third book was about?  (God only knows with that description— that description could equally apply to the work of Bret Easton Ellis or Jennifer Aniston)(it may be worth noting there’s literally zero about that description where I couldn’t find a million other things to satisfy that niche first, before I turn to something your publishers sets at a $20 list price).  Also your publisher description for your third book starts with “Set in the same universe as Troop 142"…?  I didn’t read Troop 142 so does that mean I have to read that first?  Is it the continuing adventures of those characters?  Comic fans all have some level of OCD so if you say "same universe" (whatever that means), no one is going to start at episode 2— that’s not how our people are built.  And why would you make a sequel to something no one bought to begin with? 

I can’t guess what relationship your publisher has with libraries, who I’d imagine would be a key potential buyer for you(?).  None of the rest of their catalog seems very library-oriented, though. 

(Also it seems like you’re trying to do ensemble storytelling in comics, or at least none of your ad copy except your first book mentions a central character with an interesting dilemma, which … Other than Love & Rockets, who has made that work?  There’s a certain challenge there even if everything else goes great)

What was your business model?

Some interesting thoughts, even if a bit harsh. mikedawwwson twiststreet

(Source: mikedawwwson)

Advice to the mid-career cartoonist who has failed to build an audience

mikedawwwson:

Advice to the mid-career cartoonist who has failed to build an audience

I’ve been publishing comics for coming on twenty years now. It’s hard to pinpoint a start-date, as like many cartoonists I’ve just been drawing my whole life, but sometime around ‘95 would be when I began putting out ‘zines…

Some honest numbers. That seems so sad. I feel like there’s been quite a bit of buzz around Angie. I even saw someone with a t-shirt of the fist here in brighton (uk). I know it was probably not official, but that struck me as meaning something. mikedawwwson I guess Freddie and Me had the benefit of being associated with one of the world’s most famous rock stars. Maybe you should go for ‘jagger and me’ or ‘wowie Bowie and me’. Sorry to be flip. But there is that thought. Still beautiful. Love Elfquest always

(Source: mikedawwwson)

stellarleuna:

My greatest influences artistically are probably Jaime Hernandez, Bruce Timm and the cult television series, ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer’.

Great set of influences to have stellarleuna

“It takes the same amount of effort to make bad art as to make good art, and you won’t know which you’ve made until you release it into the wild. You can continue to refine a work until it doesn’t set off your own quality alarms, but that’s no guarantee that what you’ve made will touch anybody.”

—   Nate Simpson (via galitl)

Episode 041 • NEAR MINTerview w/ Nate Simpson

slavicinferno:

Ben Peirce returns with another NEAR MINTerview. This time, our guest is Nate Simpson, the breakout writer/artist behind the hit new seriesNonplayer from Image Comics. Nonplayer #1 took the comics world by storm selling out across the country and grabbing tons of praise from critics…

Warner Bros. Purchases Film Rights to Nate Simpson's 'Nonplayer'!!!

slavicinferno:

An Image Comics series that ComicsAlliance previously described as “classic” is being eyed as a potential tent pole film for Warner Bros. Nonplayer, the in-progress miniseries written and lavishly illustrated by Nate Simpson, has had its film rights been picked up by the studio and will be…

REPRINT: Here Comes Tomorrow, my interview with NONPLAYER's Nate Simpson

joekeatinge:

About a month ago Nate Simpson’s NONPLAYER hit stands after years of anticipation and it certainly didn’t disappoint. Reviews were solid. Fans were excited. Retailers sold out.

So did Image.

It was a big day for Nate, but before everything went down we spoke in the wee hours of the morning…

(Source: ifanboy.com)